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Department of French & Italian at Emory

French Graduate Seminars, Fall 2013

FREN 505        Problems in Foreign Language Teaching
Lilia Coropceanu
Mondays 1-4PM
(Cross-listed with LING 505)

Content: This course presents an overview of current second language learning theories, a description and evaluation of existing second language teaching methods, and a discussion of major topics of instructional concern within the foreign language profession. The course goal is to provide experiences that facilitate the development of professional foreign language educators through practical classroom implementation and evaluation of research-based foreign language teaching practices.
Readings include:
Kern, Richard. Literacy and Language Teaching. Oxford University Press, 2000.
Janet K. Swaffar, Katherine Arens. Remapping the Foreign Language Curriculum: An Approach through Multiple Literacies. New York: MLA, 2005.
Graves, Kathleen. Designing Language Courses: A Guide for Teachers. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle, 2000.
Hiram, Maxim. Advanced Foreign Language Learning: A Challenge to College Programs. Ed. with Heidi Byrnes.  AAUSC Series Issues in Language Program Direction. Boston: Heinle, 2004.
Assessment: Class participation and preparation (10%); Classroom observation reports (20%, 30% for undergraduates); Lesson plans, classroom demonstrations, and self-evaluations (20%, 30% for undergraduates); Self-reflective journal (20%, not required for undergraduates); Evaluation of a professional presentation (10%); FL teaching philosophy (20%)

 

FREN 770        The Cultivation of the Self
Dalia Judovitz
Tuesdays 1-4PM
(Cross-listed with CPLT 751; Phil 789; RLTS 750)

Content: Based on Pierre Hadot’s "spiritual exercises" and Michel Foucault’s theoretical writings on the techniques entailed in the cultivation of the self, this course examines its elaboration in the early modern period in Montaigne’s Essays. At issue will be the relation of self-knowledge to the care of the self, insofar as its modification and transformations rely on spiritual and corporeal practices and disciplines. We begin by analyzing the philosophical traditions that informed the pagan construction of the self in Marcus Aurelius’s Meditations and its spiritual, Christian elaborations in St. Augustine’s Confessions, in order to elucidate Montaigne’s appropriation of such subjects of meditation, as the contemplation of death, illness, misfortune, friendship, sexuality, and the passions. How do strategies of stoic inspection and control of representations or later Christian models of asceticism, based on self-control and renunciation, give way to a model of self-cultivation that will seek the enjoyment rather than the reform of being?  We will consider the seminal role of reading and writing in composing the self and fashioning its “style,” which is not restricted to writing, but which as ethos of self-formation and practice of embodiment emerges as a “style of life.” In conclusion, we analyze how this meditative tradition of self-examination and cultivation is brought to an end by the Cartesian redefinition of knowledge as certitude that will radically objectify both the subject’s relations to itself and the world, thereby precluding access to its modes of conduct and being. 
Readings include:
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations; Hadot, “Spiritual Exercises,” Philosophy as a Way of Life; Hadot, “Marcus Aurelius,” Philosophy as a Way of Life; Foucault,” Foucault, “The Cultivation of the Self,” Care of the Self;  Foucault, “Technologies of the Self,” Ethics; Foucault, The Use of Pleasure (selections); Foucault, The Care of the Self (selections); Foucault, “Self-Writing” Ethics; Foucault, “The Prose of the World,” The Order of Things”; St. Augustine, Confessions; Marin, “Echographies,” Crossreadings; Butler, “Introduction,” Bodies that Matter; Descartes, Discourse on the Method; Michel de Montaigne’s Essays (selections).
Texts:
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations ISBN: 0143036270
St. Augustine, Confessions ISBN-10: 014044114X
Michel de Montaigne’s Essays ISBN-10: 0804704864
Descartes, Discourse on the Method ISBN-10: 0486432521
Foucault, The Uses of Pleasure ISBN-10: 0394751221
Foucault, The Care of the Self ISBN-10: 0394741552
Other selected readings are available on Woodruff Library Direct Reserves

 

FREN 775        Baudelaire & Benjamin: Poetry of Modern Life
Elissa Marder
Wednesdays 1-4PM
(Cross-listed with CPLT 751)

Content:  Baudelaire’s poetry continues to address contemporary readers and contemporary concerns.   From the first publication of Les Fleurs du Mal in 1857 up to the present day, Baudelaire’s poetry has fascinated many, if not most, of the major philosophers and thinkers of the 20th century (including: Valéry, Sartre, Bataille, Blanchot, Proust, de Man, Derrida, etc).  Before his untimely suicide in 1940, Walter Benjamin spent much of the last decade of his life in Paris working on his great unfinished book on the Paris Arcades known now as the Passagen-Werk..   Benjamin’s writings on Baudelaire provide critical access to his conceptions of materialist historiography, translation, experience, the body, and allegory in his late works. By reading Baudelaire through Benjamin (and other readers) we will attempt to understand why Baudelaire remains the poet of modern life. 
Texts:  Baudelaire: Les Fleurs du Mal, Le Spleen de Paris, Le Peintre de la vie moderne, Les Paradis artificiels.  Benjamin, Charles BaudelaireThe Arcades Project (Das Passagen-Werk) and selected essays.

 

FREN 780        Literary Theories
Geoffrey Bennington
Thursdays 1-4PM
(Crosslisted with CPLT 750R)

Content:
The course explores some of the ways in which an influential way of thinking about language has affected ways of thinking about literature. After investigating the main tenets of structuralist theory, as derived from Saussure’s Cours de linguistique générale, we shall go on to see how the internal logic of structuralism led to the rather different positions often referred to as ‘post-structuralism’ and/or ‘post-modernism’, and to a questioning of the position of theory itself.
Texts: TBA
Particulars: TBA

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