Past Events

2018-2019

Textual Drifting:

A Roundtable with Kim Thúy

Thursday, April 18th | 4:30pm | White Hall 101

 

Thuy

 

Kim Thúy is a Vietnamo-Canadian fiction writer, performer, translator, chef, and former lawyer. Acknowledged as one of the major contemporary writers of Canada, Quebec, Vietnam and of the French language, she fled her native Vietnam in 1978 with other boat-people and settled in Montréal, Québec. Stemming from this experience of forced migration, her work deals primarily with the question of refugees, displacement, gender, and identity. All her novels relentlessly discuss issues of global migration and human rights as they stage the meeting of the two hemispheres. She has written three novels, including Ru, an autobiographical novel that won multiple awards. She has also published a cookbook about Vietnamese women and their culinary traditions. Most of her books have been translated into multiple languages. 

This event is co-sponsored by The Hightower Fund, The East Asian Studies Program, The Department of Russian and East Asian Languages & Cultures, The Comparative Literature Speaker Committee, The Department of Anthropology, The Department of Comparative Literature, The Department of English, The Psychoanalytic Studies Program and The French Enrichment and Response Association.

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html

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Duo Infernale

With violonist Domenic Salerni and bassist Adam Bernstein

Thursday, April 18th | 6:30pm | White Hall 205

  Inferno

 

Violinist Domenic Salerni and bassist Adam Bernstein perform an original film score (by Domenic Salerni) to Dante’s Inferno (Giuseppe de Liguoro, 1911), the first feature-length Italian film. De Liguorio’s film is based on the aesthetic of late-nineteenth-century artist Gustave Doré. 

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html

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"Tournées Film Festival"

April 2, 4, 5 and 6 | White Hall 207

 

Tournees

Tuesday, April 2 at 7:00pm: 120 Battements par minute/BPM

Thursday, April 4 at 6pm: Visages, villages/Faces, Places and a t 8pm: Une vie violente/A Violent Life

Friday, April 5 at 6pm: Moi, un noir/ I, A Negro and at 8pm: Félicité

Saturday, April 6 at 7:00pm: L’Atelier/ The Workshop

All screening will take place in White Hall 207

Tournées Film Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment.

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html

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Talk by Professor Marco Jacquemet

"Transidioma: Language and Power in the Digital Age"

Thursday, March 28th | 4:15pm | Math and Science Center, E208

 

Jacquemet

Abstract: The experience of cultural globalization, and the communicative disorder it entails, requires a serious retooling of most basic units of linguistic analysis. The chaos and indeterminacy of contemporary flows of people, knowledge, texts, and commodities across social and geographical space affects most sociolinguistic assumptions behind social interactions. In particular, we can no longer assume that shared knowledge, especially indexical knowledge, still serves to bind people together, facilitate interactions, and negotiate conflicts. By introducing the concept of transidioma—i.e. the ensemble of communicative practices of people embedded in multilingual environments and engaged in interactions that blend face-to-face and digitally-mediated communication—this lecture explores the problematic nature of late-modern communication, characterized as it is by asymmetrical power, multiple communicative agents with competing agendas, multilingual and hybridized talk, and multimodal (especially digital) forms of interaction. Using data from various ethnographic sites (but in particular from asylum hearings), this lecture documents the renewed reliance on denotational references as a primary strategy to handle interactions in multilingual, power-saturated settings. The claim is that it is time to go even beyond a “linguistics of contact” to examine the transidiomatic strategies (such as denotational-heavy interactional moves) which are the building blocks of a sociolinguistics of multilingual mixing, communicative recombinations, and xenoglossic becoming.

Marco Jacquemet is Professor of Communication and Culture at the University of San Francisco. His current scholarship focuses on the communicative mutations produced by the circulation of migrants, languages, and media idioms in the Mediterranean area. He is writing a book based on this research, called “Transidioma: Language and Power in the Digital Age” (Wiley, forthcoming). His most significant English publications to date are Ethereal Shadows: Communication and Power in Contemporary Italy (co-authored with Franco Berardi; Autonomedia, 2009), and Credibility in Court: Communicative Practices in the Camorra's Criminal Trials (Cambridge University Press, 2009, 2nd edition; winner of the BAAL Book of the Year Award). He is also active in Italian and European mediactivist and refugee rights networks.

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html

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Talk by Professor Ananya Jahanara Kabir

"Créolité and Coolitude, the Indian on the Plantation"

Monday, December 3rd | 2:00pm | White Hall 110

 

Kabir

The abolition of slavery worldwide in course of the 18th century was followed by the creation of a new source of plantation labour through various inter-imperial collaborations: indentured workers from Asia. The indentured labour diasporas that were superimposed on existent African-heritage and creole populations created through slavery, introduced new demographic and cultural elements; these, in turn, have generated specific consequences within the project of creolization that the Plantation catalysed. What are the memorial repercussions of the Indian on the Plantation? Using the concepts of ‘Creolité’ (as developed by Chamoiseau, Barnabé, and Confiant), and ‘Coolitude’ (as developed by Khal Torabully), I reveal how cultural and curatorial practices from the Indian Ocean and the Caribbean are grappling with the re-calibration of the Plantation’s symbolic economy necessitated by the entangled memories of the ‘coolie’, the ‘master’, and the ‘slave’.

Ananya Jahanara Kabir is Professor of English Literature in the Department of English, King’s College London

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html

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Talk (in French) by Professor Babacar Mbaye Diop

"African Art and Universal Modernity"

Tuesday, October 16th | 4:15pm | Board Room, Michael C. Carlos Museum

 Diop

Babacar Mbaye Diop is a professor of Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art at the University Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar. He is author of Critique de la notion d’art africain. Approches historiques, ethno-esthétiques et philosophiques (2011) and Omar Pène. Un destin en musique (2016) and over a dozen articles devoted to African art history. He has edited two collections of essays La conscience historique africaine (2008) and Le destin de la Négritude (2009). Diop is also a curator and works as an advisor for several artists. He was the Director of the 11th edition of Dakar Biennale, the largest art event in Africa. Diop has organized several solo and group exhibitions. He is currently the President of the Senegalese section of the International Art Critics Association (AICA).

For directions and parking information, go to : http://emap.fmd.emory.edu/website/campus/index.htm, click on "Main Campus" and search for White Hall. There is free parking available after 5 at the Fishburne parking lot or free after 7 at the Oxford Deck parking lot. More information: http://transportation.emory.edu/parking/visitors.html